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something also about the fiscal cliff. something you haven't heard about is rural america is under threat from a major raise in taxes. death and state taxes. throw up the map. senator from wyoming put this out. 526,421 family farms threatened by the new death tax. mostly because assets are tied up in land. you're land rich and cash poor. this hurts a lot of people. >> greg: this plays in the old phrase buying the farm. >> dana: it plays in something i want to tease for friday, which is i am -- i got to buy the farm. get it. think we haven't heard that. >> bob: promote something? >> dana: on friday, tomorrow i'm going to vegas and i'm going to the national rodeo -- the national finals rodeo sponsored by wrangler. i went last year and i got to interview the rodeo queen. the new rodeo queen this year and talk to a few other people and chance to go to the rodeo and see my family. >> eric: that's nice. >> dana: that's it? "that's nice." >> kimberly: it sundays fun. you know how to ride a horse. >> bob: ride a bull. >> dana: we talked about greg's book for three weeks. >> kimberly: so
to happen? are we going to go up the fiscal cliff? isn't a mountain or a clip? somebody has to do something. >> everyone is fighting over tax increases and tax hikes. i get that. we need to find something they agree on. we need to take the pieces of the puzzle into them together. tracy: yes, they end up using every dollar that they have and there is nothing left at the end of the day. it is almost how we feel is the american people watching us. they are just waiting our money while they are fighting. >> where has everyone been the last two years? that is the biggest problem. can you get to economize everyone feels okay with? a really good compromise from both parties is important. it is an actual compromise. an amicable resolve. i think sitting here watching the news, sitting in sending an agreement, who knows what would happen? time is ticking. tracy: have there been any glaring mistakes that they have made in the compromising process? >> well, i think that people are coming from a viewer standpoint, they are saying, okay, if you're not showing all your cards. we were going behind closed d
this if it was not a mandate the people sent us to go do. >> something on all of our minds is the fiscal cliff. i would be remiss if i did not ask you both to weigh in on it in the following way. first, what is going on that we do not understand? number two, what should happen? number 3, what is the rsc going to do to help us get to that sector state, and what should happen? either of you want to chime in on that? >> first of all, if you look at where we are right now, and because of a number of reasons, a few of them going back to the last debt ceiling bill -- i did not vote for the budget control act, and because it did not address the real problem, and that is spending. if you look at the debate, it is mostly a debate about how much in taxes to raise, and the president keeps moving the goal post. he keeps adding more to it. he has an insatiable appetite to spend money and attack other people for it. we are not talking about addressing the real problem. i do not think anybody's taxes should go up. barack obama said three years ago, if you raise taxes in a bad economy, it will make things worse. we ar
, andrew. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. i want to talk to you specifically about something else going on in the washington. you were no fan of the president in the run up to the election and there were so many people on wall street who frankly were not fans and were outspoken about it. now, there seems to be a move afoot within washington and some level on wall street to try to mend those fences. what's going on? can you take us behind the scenes a little bit? >> i think it's pretty clear we're supposed to be one country. we have a new president, we have a four year run and i think people have to find some common ground. i think the president is reaching out pretty aggressively in the context of trying to make connections to the other side to get a budget deal done which i think he's really very committed to wanting to do. >> when you look at the election results, and you look at where we are in this conversation about the fiscal cliff and raising taxes, do you say to yourself, that he has a mandate to raise tax rates or not? >> well, geez, i think he thinks he does in a certain
going over the fiscal cliff and something technical comes out in the unemployment rate drops for some reason. ashley: let's hear from the man himself, mr. bernanke. >> good afternoon. it has been about three and a half years since the economic recovery began. the economy continues to expand at a moderate pace. unfortunately however unemployment remains high. about 5 million people, more than 40% of the unemployed have been without a job for six months or more. millions more who say they would like full-time work an have only found part-time employment or stop looking entirely. the conditions in the job market now show waste of human and economic potential. return to broad-based prosperity will require sustained improvement in the job market which in turn requires stronger economic growth. meanwhile apart from some temporary fluctuations largely reflected swings in energy prices, it is likely to run at or below the federal market committee's 2% objective in coming quarters over the longer term. against a macroeconomic backdrop includes high unemployment and subdued inflation, the fomc
about something that is on everybody's mind, the fiscal cliff. oh my goodness, the fiscal cliff is now just -- wow, 20 days away. so what are we going to do? some have suggested that we really have to deal with entitlements. and i'm here to agree that we can and we should deal with entitlements. certainly two of those issues, which i really don't think we ought to call entitlements but are fundamental programs here in america for americans, should be dealt with. one that some people want to put on the table really doesn't deal with the deficit at all, and that's social security. so before we even get into this discussion tonight, let's just understand or anybody that cares to take on this issue that in dealing with the fiscal cliff, social security is not the problem. the deficit is not caused by social security. social security has never been and in its present form, will not be part of the deficit issue. it's separate and apart. it is a special program. has its own source of revenue. has its own trust fund and isn't running the deficit at all and has not run a deficit. so let's put s
something that is more pragmatic. the fiscal cliff has gotten more pessimistic almost every day. we really cannot go over it. there is one thing that gives me a little hope. it seems to me there are three things we almost absolutely have to fix. one david mentioned, the alternative minimum tax. right now, we have to fix it retroactively for 2012. if we do not do that, there will be over 25 million americans who will get a real shock when they do their tax returns. early. i am told they are not prepared. -- the irs is not prepared for the consistency or fixing datethey have to reprogram because they have to reprogram their computers. all sorts of other things. the other thing is that i cannot and imagine we will allow reimbursements. there will not be 50 doctors serving the medicare program. thirdly, i really think we have to fix the estate tax, which exemption. -- which goes back to 8 $1 million exemption. in my neighborhood, that is a house. i would strongly recommend that die in 2013. [laughter] i said that at an earlier meeting and a congressman responded, but you should commit suicide
try to pass something in the senate that would have put food stamps on the table for the fiscal cliff negotiations and failed in the senate. jenna: let me ask you that is it part of the fiscal cliff negotiations or are food stamps in their own column right now? >> reporter: he tried. it is considered an entitlement program so it has to be funded. he did try to get the specific measure passed in the senate and it failed. jenna: any response from the administration on this? >> reporter: we reached out to the white house on this and want to give them opportunity to explain or comment on the fact under president's first term food stamps are up 39%. amount of americans dependent on them. the white house directed us to the u.s. department of agriculture and oversees this program and other similar programs. here is what they told us. the increase in snap participation during the 2008 and 2010 pared of economic decline which include the recent recession was consistent during increase in previous periods of economic decline. senator sessions and others make a point. the math doesn't add up. as
from washington and the rhetoric over the fiscal cliff. it was the fifth straight session of gains, with the buyers out at the opening bell. the index lost some momentum around 2:30 eastern time, something traders blame on comments from senate majority leader harry reid. reid said it would be extremely difficult to get legislation averting the fiscal cliff through the senate before christmas. with today's seven-tenths of a percent gain, it brings the index back to a level last seen on election day. for the year, its up 13.5%. trading volume increased to 691 million shares; just over 1.9 billion shares on the nasdaq. the technology sector was back in the leader position, up 1.4%. health care and telecommunications were up 1%. with the tech sector up, apple was helping out as it rebounded a little from its recent sell- off, but on lighter volume. shares rose 2.1%. piper jaffray's apple analyst predicts a more steady stock rally next year, and he's stking with his $900 ice taget. it was a pair of business software firms that had the best percentage gains inside the tech sector. citrix
the white house wants as a result of the fiscal cliff deal. they don't want to see a lapse, for instance, in the payroll tax cut. although they'd be fine with it being replaced by something else. unemployment insurance passed, infrastructure spending, those are incentives for the white house to cut a deal on the fiscal cliff as opposed to just going over it and saying, okay, we'll just take the, you know, sequester cuts and bush tax rates. >> that's right, and they were willing to do that in 2010 and were criticized, of course, by the base of the party because they felt so strongly about the stimulus measures. that shows how firmly the president is going to fight for those in the final package. >> i think there's so many reasons why boehner has to take a deal, though, in addition. if you look at the polls, 2 to 1, the public blames the republicans if there is no deal. and he's, meanwhile, gotten his tea party radicals, he's punished them for not following his line and his leadership. so, you know, look at wall street, they so far the market's been up, they seem to be expecting a deal. >>
cliff argument. turns out he's not alone. let's look at something we've been seeing this week. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your first world problems and getting on youtube so you can see gang 'nam style. ♪ gangnam style >> and start using those sprerbl social media skills to sign people up on this baby. three people a week, let it grow and don't forget, take part or get taken apart. these old coots will clean out the treasury before you get there. >> ifill: "these old coots will clean out the treasury." this is alan simpson in his best but a completely different venue. >> i talked to him today and he said "i think i could go around the world in 90 days and never had the impact that this silly little thing did." and the idea behind this, he's hooked up with "the can kicks back" helping young people try to get involved and get engaged in the fiscal cliff and making decisions. and they're using a lot of twitter and other social media to make their point. >> ifill: they tweeted "when politicians delay, young people pay, it's time to fix our debt." is this effective?
, very quickly on the talks. the fiscal cliff. how many "meet the press"s do we have left? >> we may have a lot. my indications from the hill and the white house, you are probably hearing this. they really are dug in on they have to give on rates first. >> they don't want to negotiate? >> they don't want to negotiate on medicare to find out they won't negotiate on the taxes. they can do a middle class tax deal and delay the sequester. they could avoid the deadline. >> good news for every sunday. >> i do think people have a high level of frustration with this. >> cynicism. you see it. the public gets it and they are not happy about it. >> thanks. >> congratulations and ebook. i will download it now, i promise. from nbc publishing is available on your ipad and ipad minis. >> i love it. it saved my life. >> you could watch "meet the press" on your local station. quickly before we go to break, opening bell just rang on wall street. the market starting in positive territory. everyone anticipating the announcement of qe 4. the fed chairman after the fed wraps up the two-day meeting and buy up m
. don't go over a fiscal cliff." or, you know, "pay our bills," or, "do something about the budget." now, i think even though the people tend to not be open to a lot of different views, they want the people they elect to make government work. >> so, we have created a political system that rewards intransigence. >> we've created a system that says, "we reward incivility. we reward refusal to compromise. we punish people who compromise and are civil and get along well with the people on the other side of the aisle." so, why are we surprised that that's what we get in everything in life? you get what you reward. and you don't get what you punish. and that's what we've done to our political system. >> what's in store for the fate of a democracy that cannot be flexible enough to compromise between its strongly-held prejudices? >> you know, if you have hardening of the arteries, it'll kill you as a person and it'll kill you as a country. what you have to do is to be able to maintain the health of the democracy by saying, "it depends on people of different perspectives to come together, have in
to discuss the fiscal cliff tug-of-war is a democrat from new york state, senior house of the financial services committee, representative meeks, good to have you with us. let's turn to entitlement spending. that is of high importance in solving the fiscal cliff negotiations and in a longer term way bringing the country to a sustainable fiscal course. what specific changes to medicare or medicaid would you be willing to imbraes today right new that would slow the growth in our medical spenting? >> i'm not going to debate the specifics on television. i think that what the president is doing, is clear that he has indicated that we have to raise the tax rate. the tax rates, bush tax cuts, was temporary in nature. >> that's not what i asked. i asked what specific would you be willing to do to address what is clearly the number one thing that is going to blow the hole in not only the economy but federal spending, federal budget over the next generation. >> what we have to do is negotiate. everything should be on the table. i think the president indicated that everything would be on the table
to look at because they're going to solve the fiscal cliff issue, but after it is done you will see some serious selling pressure here. david: we will come back to you when the s&p futures close to get a peek into what might happen tomorrow. liz: what an interesting day with bizarre behavior with the market. senior managing director joining us along with profits investors and portfolio manager. you have been a little bit more bearish all along, but i guess any downside to what you see the fed announced today, people worried about tying into the 6.5% unemployment, are we missing something here? >> the fed is being way too transparent. liz: do you think he talks too long? >> he had the stage and everybody will be paying attention to every utterance, but the half-life is getting shorter and shorter. this one is an hour or two. so far the annual yearly high. i expect that we'll still be the annual high, and i expect we will have challenges from here because the fed is giving up the ghost on the political forces fixing anything substantive on the fiscal side and giving up in terms of the econ
the fiscal cliff deal very closely and they continue to move higher. that is the interesting part. do the big investors miss something. i say the markets should be optimistic. we are going to ask an expert next up. i'm larry kudlow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our etfs online, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 commission-free, from your schwab account. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so let's talk about saving money, tdd#: 1-800-3
to actually get something done to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> and what's going on in those negotiations that we don't know. >> exactly. so we going to talk to the man who may know right? >> the man who's wired in washington. >> exactly. bob woodward knows the white house and he's covering washington for years. he'll be on later this morning. >> announcer: this portion of "cbs this morning" sponsored by international delight coffee creamers. what's your i.d.? who thinks two is better than one? so all of you do. yes, for sure. now what's better? being able to shoot two lasers out of both of your eyes at the same time or just one laser out of one eye? [ all kids ] two! [ moderator ] okay, why? if it's just one beam -- okay, it does a little bit of damage. two beams -- it will make something explode! and that's more fun? yeah! and it's more powerful you're saying? yeah! [ male announcer ] it's not complicated. doing two things at once is better. and only at&t's network lets you talk and surf on your iphone 5. ♪ ♪ online outfit piccolo headphones buy now broadway show meg
get a breakle hand maybe something late saturday and sunday. >> cold is the main thing to focus on. >> yes, as the wind dies down, critical minute number. >> thank you, steve. >> any time. >> as the fiscal cliff inches closer, we will have an update on the progress coming to an agreement. >>> it is a rush to the altar. some believe it is extra lucky to tie the knot today. card hassles? introducing chase liquid. the reloadable card that's easy to activate and can be used right away. plus, you can load cash or checks at any chase depositfriendly atm and checks right from your smartphone. get rid of prepaid problems. get chase liquid. [ female announcer ] at yoplait, we want you to feel even better about your favorite flavors. so when you call, tweet, and post, we listen. that's why yoplait light and yoplait original are now made with no high fructose corn syrup. and why we use only natural colors and natural flavors in yoplait original. so, anything else we can do for you, let us know. but you'll keep it to yogurt, right? 'cause we shouldn't really help with your love life. yoplait.
seriously we are, up next, the fiscal cliff. it could last forever apparently. the scary prediction is next in the guest spot. [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. hi, i'm ensure clear... clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've got nine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. >> every day we are closer to the fiscal cliff. >> solving our fiscal challenge
, there he is, i'm free. i'm going to america. vamos miami. mcafee. wow. time for the daily fiscal cliff update as much as i am bored to tears with this story. bored. bored horrible. they will get something done. or they're not. tenth days from potential economic crisis leading republicans warn lawmakers no one is leaving washington, dc, for the holidays, until a deal is done. that would probably include wendell. who is the grinch? >>reporter: house majority cantor who is predicting lawmakers may stay until christmas and come back between christmas and new years. doesn't seem to have been much progress since the first post election face-to-face talks between the president and speaker boehner on sunday but aides say the president is eager for a compromise but at the same time they defended his public prediction that speaker boehner will give up trying to extend the public administration's upper income tax cuts. >> the president predicted the speaker boehner would not want to hold a position and that republicans in general would not want to maintain a position that would result in everyone
to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff, the disastrous i ask unanimous consent sequences of our not acting, tax increases for every american taxpayer, massive cuts to defense at a time when the threats around the world are as varied and as great as we've seen in a long time. other essential programs of the federal government being affected by that. that's the last thing we need in this tepid economy with a lot of people out of work and hoping for some consensus to come together to provide a -- a long-term solution to our fiscal problem that continues to have a negative effect on our economy and more importantly, keeps people out of work. and so as that clock ticks, some are saying, well, partisanship is just too great in washington. the country's too divided. we're not going to be able to reach a consensus here in terms of how to address this problem. i disagree with that. over the last two years, and more, we have had a number of proposals brought forward on a bipartisan basis. it started with simpson-bowles, the former chief of staff to president clinton and al for a lon time, recognized
in that thing that rhymes with fiscal cliff. while that's going on and will keep going on for a while, your united states senate is haggling over something that might be even more important to the health of the republic, at least if in the future we want to, i don't know, solve any problems ever. i'm speaking, of course, of that great scourge the filibuster. that senate only rule that allows any senator in the majority or the minority to force legislation to pass not by the standard 51 votes, but by 60. which for most bills means certain death. rarely do 60 senators agree on anything. and over the last few years, the use and abuse of the filibuster, mainly but not exclusively by republicans, has reached record-breaking senate stopping heights. so what do you do? if you are harry reid, lead other telephone democrats in the senate, you try to reform it. and if you're mitch mcconnell, the republican leader who is using it all the time because it is your main kind of power you try to stop reform of it. now there are a couple of plans for changing the fill buster to make it less common or more d
. is this something that can work out. like they did it wall street before the fiscal cliff hits? if we could rebuild when we're in such bad shape. host: thank you, judy. guest: repaying the money that was barred from social security. that money will be repaid unless congress does something different. think about the $2.7 trillion as spending authority for the social security administration. they can pay full benefits under the law. that money will be paid back over time unless congress changes something. putting more revenue money into social security, right now the appetite in congress is to cut spending. that might be a difficult sell. one reason the program is popular is it is self funded through payroll taxes. there's been a temporary cut in payroll taxes over the past two years. to change the funding of the nature could be done. advocates worry about the consequences of that and making it compete with other dollars with other government programs. congress doesn't touch it and still stays there. if it is competing for scarce dollars, it is more likely it will be cut. host: we saw a changeover a
. >> this compromise or set of compromises that gets us over the fiscal cliff will set the stage for president obama to craft a compromise and demographics. the republicans know they have to compromise and get something done on immigration. tax reform, the republicans have said they want tax reform. president obama said the same. we need tax reform. immigration and tax reform post the fiscal cliff will create a legacy and may see congress doing something. >> that is why it is so important that they figure out a way to come together before the end of the year hopefully. if the environment is poisoned like it was after the stimulus, after the health care debate, the next four years will be ugh low. >> that's true. the higher number of women increases the chances. we will see. >> i saw the women here smiling. we were talking about how collaborative they were. the guys, not so much. >> we don't smile. i agree. the more women the better. i'm agreeing with you. can i say nothing? i said the more women, the better. i'm agreeing with you. the more women, the less self destructive egos and getting to a deal.
. wall street is very, very nervouu about the future even if we don't hit the fiscal cliff. wall street sort of fantasy would be to impose simpson-bowles. you do a radical change, close all the loopholes, that is probably not going to happen. we're lucky if we get some sort of a deal to get us beyond the fiscal cliff and budget cuts kick in. even take that out of it, they are just increasingly pessimistic about the future. tracy: you have dodd-frank coming, regulations for which you have to appear. >> morgan stanley is not cutting medicare, that is what happens with the fiscal cliff. liz: i think they took our comments from when citigroup led off people and said don't do that in december, we have to do it, and do it in november. >> he is a good guy. totally opposite, very rational, nice, smart guy. he does have a firm to run. and he has economic realities, giving you the economic realities of morgan stanley. i hear there could be cuts there as well. i don't think morgan stanley will go a deep as citigroup. i think they will do a little bit. we should also point out one other thing, cove
have something to do with the fiscal cliff. there's a bit of a slowdown there. the economy is moving along, not as robustly as they'd like it to be, which is why they extend this to make money cheaper. >> what does that mean for businesses in terms of confidence? >> the first gauge we get is to see how markets are doing. there's a bit of a rally on the stock market as a result. you can never trust what happens immediately after these announcements because it could be traders doing things. dow subpoena a quarter there. you can see 27 basis points right now. what it means is the same thing it meant until now. we have long-term low interest rates. it's cheap to borrow money in america. it's not necessarily easy it to borrow money. lending standards are still high, and many businesses as we have seen that either have cash or access to credit are not making decisions until they have some certainty about what government is going to do. we may get that certainty as soon as we get a fiscal cliff deal, maybe january or february by the time we know what will happen. that could work. if everybo
are willing to compromise to avert the fiscal cliff. what are the people at home thinking of their actions. we have a pri view for a poll that debuts tonight. part of that is compromising what folks want to see from the lawmakers. >> a lot of americans want to see compromise. according to the poll, 65% want a compromise balanced deal to reduce the deficit. even if they have to reduce the entitlement program like medicare and social security and the republicans on have to support increase in tax rates for the wealthy. of course you were playing a lot of clips from people open to compromise. it does seem to be the broad parameter that want a balanced deal. that's what john boehner and president obama are currently arguing about. par are it's interesting, mark. you and the team noted the confusion, if you want. maybe because of the leadership. the headlines and the ap has the headline fiscal cliffs appear to be stalled and the hill's headline edge towards the deal and deficit reduction negotiations. are both true? >> both are true and you have to look at the totality of the story. today is wednes
americans do not realize. everyone in washington is talking about the fiscal cliff and the tax increases that might come from that. but today i want to talk about something different. those are the tax increases that are coming regardless of what happens with the fiscal cliff. and those are the tax hikes that we're seeing because of president obama's health care law. people who have been following this closely know that president obama's health care law guarantees that middle-class families will pay higher taxes. the president promised repea repeatedly that he would not raise taxes on the middle class. as a matter of fact he said -- quote -- "if you're a family making less than $200,00200,000a year, my plan won't raise your taxes one opiniony. not your income taxes, not your payroll taxes, not your capital gains taxes, not any of your taxes." that's what the president said. but once he got into office, president obama arranged for his health care plan to be written behind closed doors. democrats in congress passed it, and they did it strictly along party lines. this law has included more
. when it comes to the fiscal cliff, you have to go back to that quickly. are you going to be there on december 31st at 11:59 voting on a deal or will there be something beforehand? >> all of the commentators seem to think there is going to be a deal. i don't know. the republicans seem to be caving in or beginning to set the door to cave in on agreeing to some tax rate increases. but a deal that says what some people are talking about will increase the tax rates to not as much as they were under clinton. and return will put a limit on cost of living increases for social security, will increase the eligibility age for medicare. as the republicans are demanding is not an acceptable compromise as far as i'm concerned. you have a lot of democrats voting against any such agreement. >> eliot: you are raising the critical issue that has not gotten any substantial and necessary attention as it should which is what will the cost-cutting be. where will it come from? how will entitlements be affected if at all and wh
in there a little bit too. i love him too. also, they have two jobs to do. taxes, fiscal cliff. why do you have to bring in social security and medicare and fix something that's not broke? >> stephanie: social security's case, we keep saying doesn't add a penny to the deficit. >> it is absurd. if you're going to curtail something or act like something is horribly busted, then i would say the military expenditures that go into effect because of the sequestration actually are something that's a crucial. they're going to drop off immediately and the spending on them is overtly far beyond its necessity. >> stephanie: it is more than the military asks for. congress is trying to give them more. >> to do what with? it is not like they're not ahead technologically from -- on every front. >> but we need to be able to blow up the world 150 times not 147. >> stephanie: otherwise we're french and gay. ron in illinois, you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi ron. >> caller: good morning, steph. >> stephanie: good morning. >> caller
this discussion, this economy gets to the fiscal cliff and the more american jobs are placed in recession. >> if something goes wrong, the fed has no arrows left in its quiver. >> we're checking our lists as the "squawk on the street" countdown to christmas continues. ho, ho, ho. ♪ >> andrew ross sorkin is bringing lloyd blankfein on stage. let's take a look. here's goldman sachs ceo lloyd blankfein. >> a number of people have touched on the fiscal cliff, and i wanted to start with that, but in a different way with you this morning, in that you have been active in washington over the past couple of weeks and all this. you've been on the phone with the white house. i've read reports that you were on the phone with the white house earlier this week. just if you could, take us behind the scenes. what goes on on these conference calls with the business community? sort of what do you see actually happening right now? >> i don't want to oversell this. i was on a couple of conference calls that the white house had with myself and other people who participated in meetings at the white house. i
. >> some say it's not the end of the world if we go over the fiscal cliff but some say it could thrust us back into recession. what do you think will happen? >> i don't think there's a cliff in the sense that all of a sudden tomorrow something dramatic happens. i think stock markets sometimes react quickly, but for the most part, whether it's going to be a recession or not is a much more long, drawn-out process. but i would say that it's not a good idea to raise anyone taxes and that the marketplace does not differentiate whether you take the money from rich people, poor people or middle class. the marketplace says if you are going to take $800 billion, are you taking it out of the private sector, the productive sector, and are you going to give it to the nonproductive sector in washington? basically the sector of people who are always messing up things in the marketplace? are you going to do that? if you are going to do that, it's a bad idea no matter whether it's rich people, middle class or poor. doesn't matter. if you take money out of the private sector, it's a bad idea. >> well, it'
the fiscal cliff. but where is it all going? house speaker john boehner went to the floor and spoke about his meeting with president obama for the first time. boehner and the president sat down over the weekend. boehner says the meeting was nice and cordial but went on to attack the president's offer on spending cuts. >> we're still waiting for the white house to identify what spending cuts the president is willing to make as part of the balanced approach that he promised the american people. the longer the white house slow walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious? >> boehner and his far right caucus may find the offer unacceptable, but president obama has put a lot on the table. nancy pelosi hit back at boehner's rhetoric today. >> the fact is, the president has and democrats agree, to $1.6 trillion cuts. where are the cuts? in bills that you, mr. speaker, have voted for. >> pelosi is lobbying for house republicans to hold a vote on letting tax
airport, across the potomac from washington. so, sandra, if we hit this fiscal cliff, all the spending cuts kick in, what effect will that have on air travel? >> reporter: the big unknown is still how it will affect the everyday traveler. and that is certainly something a lot of people here are wanting to figure out. as for the air traffic controllers union, they released a statement this afternoon saying that it would be a major blow to the airline industry as well as the economy if these cuts are in effect. now, overall, we're talking about a nearly $2.2 billion projected cut to the department of transportation. half of that would come from the faa, and the tsa would suffer a $643 million spending cut. so according to the head of the tsa, they do have a plan b. they have a plan in place ready to go if these cuts are in place. now, he says that the overall front line operations would not be effective, but this would be a major severe budget cut and a lot of travelers here we spoke to, brooke, say they are paying close attention to the negotiations. >> it does concern me because, yes,
-election and weeks before the fiscal cliff he would still rather campaign than cooperate. and we'll find out this week if he has the will to change path and get something done or just double down on the campaigning. look, the election's over. the president may enjoy these political rallies, but it's really time to get serious. the american people are bravely concerned about the nation's future. they are counting on us to prevent the kind of crisis here that we have seen unfolding all across europe. republicans have engaged in these discussions in good faith. we have agreed to make tough choices. the question is where's the president? where is the president? where's the only man in the country who can make it happen? well, it appears that with just a couple of weeks left to resolve this crisis, he is busy moving the goal post. instead of leading as he was elected to do, he's out campaigning and playing games with the nation's future. so my sincere plea this morning is that the president gets serious, that he put the campaign behind him and lead. if he does, he will have willing partners. the
. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> thank you, mr. speaker. we're in this fiscal cliff talks and the president and the speaker are trying to work out a solution. and they're talking about tax raters in top 2%. mr. cohen: taxing their wealth. that's something they should do because it's fair and it gives the over 98% tax relief. but at the same time they're talking about increasing the medicare age from 65 to 67. and that's taxing the wealth of the less fortunate people who are 65 to 67. for them and for everybody, your health is your wealth. jimmy copeland a friend and semiphilosopher said that, your health is your wealth. if you raise the medicare age from 65 to 67, you're going to sacrifice the health of people who are not the most fortunate system of while we tax the income of the most wealthy, we'll be taxes what wealth theless wealthy have, their health. that's wrong. mr. president and mr. speaker should not increase that age and tax the poor. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the -- does the gentlelady from texas seek recogniti
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